fb-pixel Hiring for cultural fit? Do it the right way - Reo Group

Connecting...

W1siziisimnvbxbpbgvkx3rozw1lx2fzc2v0cy9yzw8tz3jvdxavanbnl2jhbm5lci1kzwzhdwx0lteuanbnil1d

Hiring for cultural fit? Do it the right way

Hiring for cultural fit? Do it the right way

June 2017 by

Recruiting for cultural fit can be difficult.

Hiring for cultural fit is important for many organisations, but it can be difficult for agency recruiters to get to know both parties. Here are some tips.


As workplaces grow more and more relaxed compared to the way they used to be, companies are tending to place increased emphasis on the idea of hiring for 'cultural fit.' While this might be straightforward for in-house talent acquirers who know their company culture backwards and forwards, it can be more challenging for agency recruiters in talent acquisition.

Companies are tending to place increased emphasis on the idea of hiring for 'cultural fit.' In order to properly assess someone's cultural suitability for a particular job, a recruiter must have a firm grasp on the client's organisation - its views, values and passions. Without this, you'll be blindly hoping to find a culturally suitable candidate when you don't even know what exactly that means for this particular company.

Here are some of the issues agency recruiters can run into with regards to cultural fit and some potential ways to remedy them.

Recruiting for cultural fit can be difficult.
How can recruiters accurately hire a candidate that will fit in with the client's culture?


Issues with recruiting for cultural fit

Whether or not it's a deciding factor in the hiring process, analysing a candidate's cultural fit should definitely be somewhere on the to-do list for recruiters; employees that resonate with the values of the company and get along well with the other workers will likely be more motivated, engaged and happy at work than those who don't, according to OpenView.

Finding this type of hire, however, is difficult when recruiters are asking both the clients and the talent pools surface-level 'culture' questions that don't get at the root of what really matters to either party. Performance and Behaviour Specialist Dr John Demartini claims that these types of conversations aren't typically fruitful.

"You'll get a bunch of idealisms and superficial platitudes and expectations that people think want to be heard."

"You'll get a bunch of idealisms and superficial platitudes and expectations that people think want to be heard," he says. "I'm not interested in that, it means nothing to me. I'm interested in [finding out], 'what does their life demonstrate?'"


What you should do instead

Rather than waste time sifting through candidates with average responses to superficial questions, Demartini suggests that recruiters first analyse the work values of the executive team, management team and general employees individually. This will give them a better sense of the company culture and values as a whole.

From there, recruiters can ask candidates more specifically targeted questions and discern very quickly whether or not the person would be a good fit for the client. For more recruiting tips, check out Reo's blog!